Public get say on wave farm plan

In recent weeks, officials from the Illinois Department of Agriculture and other agencies, working with the Illinois Clean Water Alliance and other conservation groups, have worked to hammer out a statewide plan to protect swimmers in Lake Michigan and its surrounding waterways.

Officials with the Ill경주출장안마inois Department of Natural Resources and Natural Resource Conservation were not immediately available for comment Monday.

The proposal to protect swimmers from potentially deadly toxic algae blooms comes after a federal advisory committee released a study in February concluding that levels of toxic algae in the lake are high enough to threaten human health and threaten the future of swimmers.

Swimmers in the lake and other nearby areas are exposed to toxic algae via the water's surface, but the threat comes at a high cost.

In 2013, https://www.aquawood.fr/products/coque-iphone-11-pro-max-fairy-world-d1711 a federal study commissioned by state and federal agencies found that the total cost to the state and the U.S. economy is about $28 million a year in damage to the state's ecosystem. In addition to those economic losses, about $4.5 million a year is lost to illness caused by water-borne viruses that can spread if the lake surface becomes contaminated.

The Illinois clean water alliance has been pushing for a statewide plan for years to protect the public from the effects 부천안마of toxic algae. The alliance, a statewide group, https://www.alpesprobois.fr/products/coque-iphone-8-support-715pascher5990 is currently working to develop a plan for the lake and its surround바둑이 사이트ing waterways to protect swimmers from potentially lethal toxic algae blooms.

While lawmakers in Springfield have not decided if they will vote on the statewide plan, supporters of the measure say it's a major step forward that could help Illinois meet its Clean Water Action Plan targets.

"This isn't a piecemeal approach, https://www.aquawood.fr/products/teen-wolf-coque-iphone-7-710pascher1936 it's a comprehensive solution for the state and the region," said Michael Cusic, a professor at Illinois State University.

In the past decade, the state has begun a variety of actions to reduce algae blooms, https://www.aquawood.fr/products/coque-samsung-j5-2016-minion-709pascher6340 among them: installing a public information campaign, https://www.alpesprobois.fr/products/coque-iphone-11-pro-max-fusion-d9766 issuing environmental regulations, https://www.aquawood.fr/products/coque-iphone-7-plus-marron-715pascher1236 and installing chemical treatments to control the bloom in the lakes, which is called an effluent control plan.

Last summer, state biologists successfully killed six immature algal blooms in the river-level portion of the lake's headwaters.

State officials hope to achieve their environmental target of zero algae bloom impacts by 2023, but Cusic cautioned that this would not be possible without substantial federal and state investment.

"We know, to our knowledge, that we have the most aggressive,

Public get say on wave farm plan

Public get say on wave farm plan

Public get say on wave farm plan

In recent weeks, officials from the Illinois Department of Agriculture and other agencies, working with the Illinois Clean Water Alliance and other conservation groups, have worked to hammer out a statewide plan to protect swimmers in Lake Michigan and its surrounding waterways.

Officials with the Ill경주출장안마inois Department of Natural Resources and Natural Resource Conservation were not immediately available for comment Monday.

The proposal to protect swimmers from potentially deadly toxic algae blooms comes after a federal advisory committee released a study in February concluding that levels of toxic algae in the lake are high enough to threaten human health and threaten the future of swimmers.

Swimmers in the lake and other nearby areas are exposed to toxic algae via the water's surface, but the threat comes at a high cost.

In 2013, https://www.aquawood.fr/products/coque-iphone-11-pro-max-fairy-world-d1711 a federal study commissioned by state and federal agencies found that the total cost to the state and the U.S. economy is about $28 million a year in damage to the state's ecosystem. In addition to those economic losses, about $4.5 million a year is lost to illness caused by water-borne viruses that can spread if the lake surface becomes contaminated.

The Illinois clean water alliance has been pushing for a statewide plan for years to protect the public from the effects 부천안마of toxic algae. The alliance, a statewide group, https://www.alpesprobois.fr/products/coque-iphone-8-support-715pascher5990 is currently working to develop a plan for the lake and its surround바둑이 사이트ing waterways to protect swimmers from potentially lethal toxic algae blooms.

While lawmakers in Springfield have not decided if they will vote on the statewide plan, supporters of the measure say it's a major step forward that could help Illinois meet its Clean Water Action Plan targets.

"This isn't a piecemeal approach, https://www.aquawood.fr/products/teen-wolf-coque-iphone-7-710pascher1936 it's a comprehensive solution for the state and the region," said Michael Cusic, a professor at Illinois State University.

In the past decade, the state has begun a variety of actions to reduce algae blooms, https://www.aquawood.fr/products/coque-samsung-j5-2016-minion-709pascher6340 among them: installing a public information campaign, https://www.alpesprobois.fr/products/coque-iphone-11-pro-max-fusion-d9766 issuing environmental regulations, https://www.aquawood.fr/products/coque-iphone-7-plus-marron-715pascher1236 and installing chemical treatments to control the bloom in the lakes, which is called an effluent control plan.

Last summer, state biologists successfully killed six immature algal blooms in the river-level portion of the lake's headwaters.

State officials hope to achieve their environmental target of zero algae bloom impacts by 2023, but Cusic cautioned that this would not be possible without substantial federal and state investment.

"We know, to our knowledge, that we have the most aggressive,